Ira Glass – Podcasts & ProTools, Speeches & Ableton Live?

Ira Glass – Podcasts & ProTools, Speeches & Ableton Live?

Here are a couple of relevant snippets from a LifeHacker interview with Ira Glass, most notably his use of Ableton Live to sequence sound bytes during speeches and presentations. “Wonky” as he refers to it. He also Podcasts and uses ProTools, and of course “The Cloud” which is working its way into the recording engineering and music composition field slowly but steadily through such things as Gobbler (really Avid? Gobbler?) DropBox, Kompoz, SongSilo, OhmStudio and many more. He also gives a nod to his Genelec 8020B studio monitors and Dorrough 12-AES digital audio meters. Hey this guy is getting cooler by the sentence isn’t he? Ira Glass is a writer, producer, storyteller, performer, and a familiar voice. His show This American Life has set the contemporary standard of nonfiction radio shows, and has influenced and inspired countless others to grab a mic and give podcasting a try. Okay warning: this is going to get a little wonky. I give a lot of speeches, easily one every two weeks, and in those speeches, I like to recreate the sound of our radio show. I narrate live, and roll in quotes and mix music, all live. For years, I needed a mixing console and CD players to do this. But now I can do it with an iPad mini. The tech isn’t complicated. I run Ableton Live software on my MacBook Air. The Air plugs into the house sound system out of the regular headphone jack. (You need to go through a direct box to push the sound up to proper levels for a professional P.A. system but direct boxes are...
Whole Lotta Love Mystery Solved via Tales from the Trenches

Whole Lotta Love Mystery Solved via Tales from the Trenches

Eddie Kramer: The first time I heard “Whole Lotta Love” was in August ’69, when Jimmy and I started working on the album’s final mix at New York’s A&R Sound. Jimmy and I had first met in 1964, when he was playing on the Kinks’ first album [“Kinks”] at Pye Studios and I was the assistant engineer. I also had heard Led Zeppelin early on in ’68, when John Paul Jones had played me an acetate of Led Zeppelin’s first album, before it was released. I was blown away—it sounded so hard and heavy. In New York, the recording console at A&R was fairly primitive. It had only 12 channels with old-fashioned rotary dials to control track levels instead of sliding faders and there were just two pan pots [control knobs] to send the sound from left to right channels. But as Jimmy and I listened to the mix, something unexpected came up. At the point where the song breaks and Robert slowly wails, “Way down inside…wo-man…you need…love,” Jimmy and I heard this faint voice singing the lyric before Robert did on the master vocal track. Apparently Robert had done two different vocals, recording them on two different tracks. Even when I turned the volume down all the way on the track we didn’t want, his powerful voice was bleeding through the console and onto the master. Some people today still think the faint voice was a pre-echo that we added on purpose for effect. It wasn’t—it was an accident. Once Jimmy and I realized we had to live with it on the master, I looked at Jimmy, he...